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Renewable support cuts put thousands of jobs and local power at risk says RegenSW


Responding to the publication today of the government's Feed-in Tariff Review Merlin Hyman, chief executive of Regen SW [1] said: "Today's announcement puts at risk thousands of jobs and will undermine the opportunity for local people, businesses and communities to take control of the way we generate, use and supply energy”.

“Because of the Feed-in Tariff communities and businesses up and down the country have had the opportunity to harness their own natural energy resources, helping to reduce and localise energy spend, tackle fuel poverty and generate an income to re-invest in the local area. The government’s focus should be on supporting this ‘people power’ and reducing consumers' exposure to volatile fossil fuel prices – not simply cutting costs.”

We share the government's ambition to reduce and eliminate subsidies but these proposals put at risk the remarkable progress the renewable energy industry is making with deployment and cost reductions."

Alistair Macpherson, CEO of Plymouth Energy Community said: "Through two highly successful community share offers, we have raised nearly £1.5 million in community investment, resulting in 29 schools and community buildings benefiting from free solar PV, with more to come. These schemes generate a vital long-term community benefit fund to ensure longevity for PEC’s work reducing fuel poverty and carbon emissions in Plymouth. None of what we have achieved would have been possible without renewable energy support systems. In the future, solar will no doubt be free from direct support, but we need a stable pathway to get there."

Fred Barker from Bude Energy Community said: "Bude Community Power was formally established in April 2015 and has identified a potential portfolio of solar PV projects of at least 800 kW capacity. Recent and proposed government policy changes make it far less likely that we will be able to establish and develop our portfolio, due to the uncertainty relating to Feed-in Tariff levels. Our aim is to develop a better energy future, with more community benefits, lower energy bills and greater independence for the Bude area, but the changes are undermining our efforts’.

Gabriel Wondrausch, managing director of Sungift Solar, said: "these proposals will put back achieving subsidy free solar power by many years, this is bad for consumers and will put up the costs of meeting our renewable energy targets”. 
 
A review of the Feed-in Tariff Scheme, the Government’s subsidy scheme for generation of renewable electricity from small-scale installations. https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/consultation-on-a-review-of-the-feed-in-tariff-scheme
 
www.regensw.co.uk.

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