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Showing posts from June, 2011

Cuts in Feed In Tariff's

There is considerable irritation within the UK renewables sector at the moment concerning cuts in government support for the Feed-in Tariff's Scheme (FiTS) following a review by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC). The cuts will entail a large reduction in the FiTS rates for systems over 50 kilowatts (kW) with those over 250 kW receiving a mere 8.5 pence per kilowatt hour (kWH). These cuts constitute a 70 percent reduction in the rates of return from FiTS and have been received as representing a significant threat to the industry with much of the medium to large scale solar industry facing an uncertain future.

Ben Warren, head of renewable energy at Ernst & Young, has been quoted as saying that: "Revisiting the feed-in tariff at such an early stage of its existence has undermined investor confidence not only in the UK solar industry, but potentially in the wider UK renewables market."

However, the Solar Trade Association in association with Ernst &…

Bristol's Green Capital Plans

Last week I went to a Green Leadership conference organised, in part, by my good friend David Saunders who is right in the drivers seat with regards to green issues and renewable energy in the city. It was certainly an inspiring event I can tell you.

But of course, David wasn't the only inspiring personage to appear at this event. The beauty of these things is that such events draw lots of people together, each with a whole set of very good ideas and eager to join in and help build a green future.

For those who don't live in Bristol, I can tell you that this city is vibrant and exciting, particularly with regard to the renewable energy and sustainability sectors which are rapidly becoming major growth industries in the region. Furthermore, in 2008 Bristol was the only UK city to be shortlisted for the European Green Capital Award, a scheme which recognises and rewards those cities making efforts to improve their local environment, economy and quality of life for urban population…

Solar Power for Social Housing

I've recently had the good fortune to start working with a company called ePV helping to write their marketing materials.

ePV is a company that operates as a funder, developer and EPC. That stands for 'Engineering, Procurement and Construction' by the way. They work within the solar PV sector specifically in partnership with UK social housing

Solar energy articles

http://www.solarenergyexperts.co.uk/free-solar-panels-for-your-home-guide
http://www.solarenergyexperts.co.uk/pros-and-cons-of-installing-solar-panels
http://www.solarenergyexperts.co.uk/buying-photovoltaic-solar-panels-dos-donts

I've just completed a series of three articles for solarenergyexperts.co.uk, a really good website which has masses of information on solar energy and solar panels, to which I've just contributed I might add. The first article (links above) explores the subject of whether you should accept the various offers of free and low-cost solar panels offered by some solar panel installers or whether you should buy your own. The more favourable option seems to be that of buying your own as there is much more money to be made through the government's Feed-In Tariff's scheme.

The second article is more general, looking at the pro's and con's of installing solar panels. It's a very good idea, especially considering the savings to be made…